Google Says It Will No Longer Read Users’ Emails To Sell Targeted Ads (did you know they did this?)

Google will no longer scan emails in Gmail accounts in order to sell targeted advertising, the company said Friday.  The company will make the change later this year, bringing Gmail in line with its G Suite products for business users. “This decision brings Gmail ads in line with how we personalize ads for other Google products,” Diane Greene, senior vice president of Google Cloud, wrote in a blog post. “Ads shown are based on users’ settings. Users can change those settings at any time, including disabling ads personalization.”

The blog post says that “Consumer Gmail content will not be used or scanned for any ads personalization after this change.” That leaves the door open for the company to continue to scan emails for other purposes, like sorting them by priority, or suggesting replies you might send and Google will continue to display ads in Gmail based on what it knows about users. Which, we know, is a whole lot.

In 2014, Gmail updated its terms of service to inform users that their emails were analyzed by software in order to target ads.

“Some of the regular people who use Google services disliked the way their email contents were being used to target ads way back in 2004,” What technology companies call “personalization” is what some people call “creepy.”

By knowing users’ interests and demographic information, Google, Facebook, and other companies can sell advertisers access to targeted audiences. Google offers users the ability to turn off ad personalization on this page.  Though Alphabet, Google’s parent company, has expanded into businesses including mobile phones, home assistants, and autonomous vehicles, it still made 88 percent of its revenue from advertising in 2016.

 

copied from NR News

WILLIAM M. CHILTON 1740 Overwood Drive Frisco, Texas 75034 Home Telephone (469) 200 5310 Cell Telephone (972) 800 0308 (bill.chilton@att.net)

Summary of Qualifications

  • 15 years + years of experience in computer science and software management for large scale clients and fortune 500 companies
  • Managed Nextel billing systems (for Amdocs)
  • Worked as a Senior Global Solution Architect for EMC
  • Implemented and helped sell STAR* solutions across Asia, Europe, South America, Mexico and US
  • Developed a training class (one and two week classes) and trained over 200 people around the world in EMC products including performance and how to present our products to customers
  • Performance Analyst when customers around the world had performance Issues and successfully remedy the situation.
  • Worked in Mexico City with HP to ensure that their new arrays would be virtualized and structured to meet their performance needs and moving the data to a new data center. We were so successful that we received 15 new contracts from HP to do the same things at all their data centers
  • Attended customer meetings with Key Executives around the world as needed with the ability to travel same day as requested
  • Available for customers on a 24 X 7 basis and giving each customer my home number to call

For the last twelve years I have worked as a Senior Global Solution Architect for EMC managing key accounts by taking the lead on technical initiatives ensuring each customer had a solution plan for their key objectives and each plan was implemented to the customer satisfaction. Worked with key executives to efficiently form a clear solution and do performance analysis to ensure that the services and products they were purchasing would work to their objectives and standards. I was only one of three GSA’s that worked with the CSE’s and were able to call the customer solution engineers (CSE’s) when help was needed or a customer had a special need that had to meet their requirements or products had to be changed or customized. I had a top secret clearance until 2014 when it expired but still have my secret clearance.

Experience

Volunteer for the last year and a half as a research director for Chris Elliott at http://elliott.org/ and developer of computer classes and teacher at Frisco Lakes learning center for introduction to computers, learning the web, email and other computer subjects.

EMC – Dell. Boston, Ma 2003 -2016

Global Solution Architect – Part of a team of 3 people selected to work with Engineering and Partners to travel the world bringing solutions to customer problems, training the field and helping with pre-sales and post-sales of Symmetrix products. Performance champion that would study arrays and detail issues on how to fix those issues plus determining how to configure new Symmetrix for best performance using modeling. I also developed training class on EMC products including STAR that I taught about the world in countries like Japan, China, India, Europe and the US including EMC partners. I have worked with VMware, Cloud computing, UNIX, LINUX and other software packages including Tier Advisor, Speed and other EMC products

Amdocs, Champaign, IL 2002 – 2003

Project Manager – Manager of UNIX team supporting Nextel production and billing operations comprising Superdome clusters, over 100 sun systems and Citrix farm of 130 servers. Developed team by organizing work schedules, utilizing personnel, working on project schedules and having successful weekend projects completed on time. Responsible for upgrading systems, performance improvements of EMC frames by moving and striping data. Solutions for ongoing projects including backup, performance, upgrades and installation of HP 64 way Superdomes

Hitachi Telecommunications, Atlanta, Georgia 2001 – 2002

Systems Engineer of post sales support of Hitachi products on Sun E4500 Enterprise servers, HP J 9000 series running HPUX 11.0, 10.2, Sun Solaris 8.0, running Oracle database and Weblogic, Veritas volume manager, Veritas file system, Oracle, Netscape, DNS and NFS on Cisco 3600 routers configured for RIP and OSPF. Liaison between customer support and development for new products enhancement. Support of product development and testing of Hitachi products in presales capacity and post sales support.

Communication Technical Systems Inc, Dallas, Texas 2001

Presales Systems Engineer – providing technical support for strategic partners and customers targeted by sales team. Accompany sales team on sales opportunities to customer sites doing presentations, helping with sales calls. UNIX administration at customer site configuring SAN (storage area networks) using McData switches connected to IBM Shark storage devices. Developed IBM AIX RS6000 system administration manual for customer.

EDUCATION

Master of Business Administration

Mercer University, Atlanta, Georgia

Bachelor of Arts in Management

Richard Stockton State College, Pomona, New Jersey

Dean’s List

I am speed certified and passed two EMC proven exams and VCE certification

TRAINING

System Administration IBM, HPUX, Inside HPUX, MC Service Guard, Networking classes for IBM AIX SP, HP, SUN and Digital Equipment, Storage area network training classes and all EMC products including XtermIO and Symmetrix.

AWARDS

EMC and VCE Certified, 4 Excellents at EMC awards 2015, 1 Gold, 2 Silver and 1 Bronze Issued by Peers.

BellSouth ACE Award (only 40 per year for all BellSouth Companies), BellSouth Department Head Awards for outstanding contributions,

*STAR

SRDF/Star is a three-site disaster recovery solution that consists of the Primary (production) site, Secondary site (regional), and the Tertiary site (out-of region). The secondary site synchronously mirrors the production site, the tertiary site asynchronously. In the event of the primary site outage, SRDF/Star allows to quickly move operations and re-establish remote mirroring between the remaining sites. It operates in two modes namely Concurrent SRDF/Star and Cascaded SRDF/Star. SRDF/Star provides the following advantages: •The ability to maintain protection and business continuance despite the loss of any site in a three-site configuration (primary, secondary, tertiary). •The ability to resume asynchronous protection between the secondary and tertiary sites, with minimal data movement, in the event of a primary site failure.

If your phone rings then stops, don’t call back – It’s a scam

If your phone rings then stops, don’t call back – It’s a scam
I’m sure at some point you have received an annoying, unsolicited phone call from someone you don’t know. They seem to come at the worst possible moments too, like when we’re about to sit down for dinner.

Some of these unsolicited phone calls are going from annoying to malicious. You need to know about the latest phone scam making the rounds so you don’t make this simple mistake.

How scammers are sticking victims with fraudulent charges
What’s happening is, scammers are auto-dialing potential victims all across the U.S. Instead of waiting for the victim to answer, the scammer lets the phone ring just once and then hangs up. By doing this, a missed call message shows up on the victim’s cellphone.

What the fraudsters are hoping for is that the victim dials the number of the missed call. If you call the number, a pre-recorded message will play. It will say something like, “Hello. You’ve reached the operator, please hold.”

Not only will you be hit with an international rate fee, but you’ll also be charged a per-minute fee for the entire time you’re on the line. How this works is, the incoming number looks like it’s a typical U.S. phone number with a three-digit area code. However, the number is spoofed and is actually going to international numbers that are set up to charge anyone who calls them.

What you need to do now
With so many phone scams these days, it’s a good idea to just not answer calls from unknown numbers. If you receive a one-ring hang up call, definitely do NOT call the number back.

If someone you don’t know is trying to reach you with an important message let them leave a voicemail. Even if they leave a contact number in a voicemail you should be cautious. Do an online search of the phone number before calling to see if there are warnings of a scam associated with it.

Here is a list of three-digit area codes that are known to be associated with this one-ring scam:

268
284
473
664
649
767
809
829
849
876
Again, if you see a missed call message with one of the area codes listed above, do not call the number back. Receiving one of these scam calls will only cost you if you dial the return number.

If you think that you have received one of these missed calls and dialed the return number, there are a couple things that you need to do.

Look closely at your phone bills – Your phone bill might fluctuate from month to month depending on overages and fees. This is common. However, you should be paying attention to each charge that shows up on your bill, you could find a fraudulent one from a scam like this. If you do see a suspicious charge, call your mobile provider to verify it. If it’s fraudulent, you can dispute it.
Check your bank accounts – It’s a good practice to check your bank accounts frequently already. If you see any suspicious charges, report them to your bank immediately.
Caution is always the best action, especially in today’s world!

Short-haul Economy Class Comparison Chart for Seats. Find a good seat go to https://www.seatguru.com

SeatGuru is a website that compares seating accommodations for airlines from all over the world. They describe foot room as “pitch,” which is the distance from the back of your chair to the back of the chair behind you. Width is the distance from armrest to armrest.

Since pitch and width measurements vary based on the size of the plane, the information below is based on an Airbus A320. According to SeatGuru, people consistently rank seats on these planes as the most comfortable.

American Airlines: 31-inch pitch, 18-inch width, no TVs, has Wi-Fi

Delta Air Lines: 31-32-inch pitch, 17.2-inch width, no TVs, has Wi-Fi

Frontier Airlines: 28-29-inch pitch, 18-inch width, no TVs, no Wi-Fi

JetBlue: 34-inch pitch, 17.8-inch width, a TV in every headrest, has Wi-Fi

Spirit Airlines: 28-inch pitch, 17.75-inch width, no TVs, no Wi-Fi

United Airlines: 30-inch pitch, 17.7-inch width, no TVs, has Wi-Fi

Virgin America: 32-inch pitch, 17.7-inch width, a TV in every headrest, has Wi-Fi

Best: Overall, JetBlue provides the most comfortable flying experience for their passengers flying coach. Customers have at least two more inches of foot room, wider seats than most of the competition, and it’s free to watch the TVs on the back of the headrests!

Worst: Frontier and Spirit are consistently ranked low by customers. Not only is there less foot room but their seat cushions do not have as much padding as the competition. However, both of these companies are considered low-cost airlines and they even advertise the fact that cutting comfort is how they are able to keep their prices low.

Although comfort is important, it may not be the most important factor that determines whether or not you purchase a ticket. If you’re simply looking for the best price then read about these Google Flights secrets.

Browsers and browsing the internet

Browsers and browsing the internet

  1. Microsoft Edge and Bing (same search engine)
  2. Chrome (In chrome you can enable duckduckgo as an extension for private browsing)
  3. Firefox
  4. Opera (you can enable vpn and duckduckgo in settings)
  5. Apple Safari
  6. Internet Explorer
  7. EPIC
EDGE

 

 

EPIC

 

Chrome

 

Firefox

 

Duckduckgo on chrome

 

Opera with VPN and duckduckgo

 

 

Internet Explorer

 

 

   

 Bookmarks

 What is a bookmark

To mark a document or a specific place in a document for later retrieval. Nearly all Web browsers support a bookmarking feature that lets you save the address (URL) of a Web page so that you can easily re-visit the page at a later time.

How do I create an internet favorite or bookmark?

https://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000858.htm

How do I manage internet favorites or bookmarks?  We will do a show and tell in class.

Cookies

What are cookies

An HTTP cookie (also called web cookie, Internet cookie, browser cookie, or simply cookie) is a small piece of data sent from a website and stored on the user’s computer by the user’s web browser while the user is browsing. The main purpose of a cookie is to identify users and possibly prepare customized Web pages or to save site login information for you.

How cookies are used

Upon each return visit to that site, your browser passes that cookie back to the server. In this way, a web server can gather information about which web pages are used the most, and which pages are gathering the most repeat hits. Cookies are also used for online shopping.

How to delete cookies

https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/how-to-delete-cookies-in-chrome-firefox-safari-and-ie/

What happens when you delete all cookies

You have a hard time finding a web page and you have to resign in as the site will not know or remember you.

Just remember that if you choose to clear your browser’s history or browse privately, you’re on your own to find a Web page again. That could haunt you when you’re looking for that ONE recipe you saw the day before for chocolate cake that was the most delicious thing you’ve ever seen. Good lucking finding it out of the other 10,300,000 recipes for chocolate cake.

History

What is a Browser History?

Every time you go online from your computer, your browser saves a copy of every page that you visit. That’s right: Your computer and Internet browser—whether you use Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, or something else—keep track of where you’ve been and a history of what pages you’ve seen.

That’s not something they’re hiding from you and it’s not a conspiracy or invasion of privacy. It’s there for your convenience. And unless you’re doing something you don’t want someone else to see, such as planning a secret birthday, it makes your online experience easier.

On all browsers, “History” is one of the drop-down menu choices across the top of the page, along with other choices such as File, Edit, View, Bookmarks and a few others. The History feature keeps tabs on your Internet browsing for as long as you’re online.

Browser application designers realized that people needed a way of knowing where they’d been and what they’d read or seen online over a long Internet session. And over time, they added helpful features to the History feature.

Still, a surprising number of people (more than you’d think) have never explored their browser’s history menu or learned about some its special features. And some people are a little leery of having their Internet history on display.

Revising history.

The history feature on our browsers is there to make our online experience simpler and to provide convenience. But it can feel a little strange, knowing that someone can peek into you browser history to see what you’ve been up to. Most of us wouldn’t like that.

Still, it doesn’t happen that often. Also, it’s only an invasion of your privacy if someone gets access to your computer and actively (or accidentally) searches your history. If you have nothing to hide, then it doesn’t matter.

Still, if your privacy is a concern, regardless of what you look at, there are a couple of things you can do, by exploring two options in the browser’s History menu.

Clear Recent History. This allows you to clear the history record and start browsing with a clean slate. If you do decide to clear your history, all your website visits will be wiped from your browser’s memory, and after you hit “Clear,” it’s gone. You’ll even get a warning before you hit “Clear Now” button that says, “This action cannot be undone.”

Private Browsing. When you select New Private Window, you’re turning off the history feature—that means whatever you look at won’t be tracked or won’t appear on the list of websites on your history list. Private browsing isn’t just about being sneaky online. It offers special benefits:

  • Private browsing is helpful if you use a shared computer, bank online, check medical records, or look at personal or private subject matter you want to keep private.
  • Security experts say that websites won’t be able to use “cookies” to track your behavior when you use private browsing.
  • You can prevent Facebook and other social media websites from tracking your online activity while you’re on their websites.

When a website places a cookie on your computer, oftentimes part of what they do is track you history to see what you’re interested in. That’s why it’s not a coincidence when you look up an article about France and then see an ad for Air France show up when you visit another website.

CHANGE THIS ONE BROWSER SETTING TO BOOK A CHEAPER VACATION OR BUY THINGS WITHOUT THE PRICE JUMPING UP

Posted on June 5, 2017

INCOGNITO MODE

This is the trick that most people never think of. Most airfare tips have to do with the airline itself, and the way these fares change over time. But this trick has to do with your browser, and how it communicates with flight-booking websites. When you upload a page, the website remembers that you visited before. Many bargain-hunters believe that this awareness causes the prices to steadily climb because you have already expressed interest in a given itinerary.
Browsing incognito
Google Chrome: There are a few ways to open an Incognito browser if you’re using Google Chrome. The first is to right click on the Google Chrome icon before you launch the application. This will bring up a menu with the option, “New Incognito Window.”

The second option is easy to use if you’re already browsing in Google Chrome. Simply open a new tab, then hit (and hold) the following keys down: Control, Shift, N (Command, Shift, N for Mac users).
Firefox: In Firefox, this private browsing option isn’t called “Incognito Mode,” it’s called “Private Window.” To access this, just open a new browser and click the Settings icon in the top right-hand corner. There, you’ll see a drop-down menu that lists an option called “New Private Window.”

Safari (on desktop): When using Safari on your Mac, you can open a Private Window in the same way as Google Chrome. Just right click on the icon, and select “New Private Window.”

Safari (on mobile): On mobile, opening a Private Window is a little bit different. While in the browser, tap the Pages icon in the bottom right-hand corner. This will show you all of the windows you have open, and at the bottom of the screen, you’ll see the + sign to open another window. Tapping the + sign will open a regular browser. If you’d rather browse privately, be sure to tap “Private” right beside it.

Android: To prevent the website from recognizing your IP address, Android users can employ their “incognito mode.” To use an incognito window on your Android device, open Chrome, then click More (the three vertical dots), then hit Incognito Window. When the new window opens, you’ll see the incognito icon, which looks like a face with a fedora and glasses.
Not every device or browser has an incognito-like feature, but there’s another way to get a similar effect: Most websites recognize your returning visit because of the cookies they install on your computer. Just delete all your cookies and browsing history, and these online services won’t recognize you.
There is some debate on whether using Incognito Windows and eliminating cookies don’t have a substantial impact on airfares. Each website works differently, so it’s hard to say. But feel free to tinker with a regular window and an Incognito Window and see what happens. When it comes to travel, it isn’t the destination but the journey.

PRIVATE BROWSING ON THE INTERNET

Posted on June 5, 2017 by chiltonweb

DuckDuckGo

Increased state surveillance, countless security breaches and widespread concern about data sharing have spooked many of us into wanting to protect our privacy more than ever.

Despite bubbling almost under the radar for nine years, anonymous search engine DuckDuckGo is now finding its stride in this current climate. In January, it announced it had passed ten billion searches, with four billion occurring in 2016.

What is DuckDuckGo?

DuckDuckGo describes itself as “the search engine that doesn’t track you”. It promises not to use cookies to follow users and says it doesn’t collect any personal information on those who use it. Even your IP address is hidden.

All hail the privacy pioneers! DuckDuckGo’s ambitious plans to be more than a search engine

How is it different to Google and Bing?

All hail the privacy pioneers! DuckDuckGo’s ambitious plans to be more than a search engine

When you click on links from Google and Bing, even in private mode, the search terms are sent to the site you’re visiting in the HTTP referrer header. When you visit that site, your computer automatically shares information, such as your IP address. This information can be used to identify you.

DuckDuckGo calls this “search leakage” and prevents it happening by default on its search results. Instead, when you click on a link on the site it redirects that request in such a way to prevent it sending your search terms to other sites. The sites know that you visited them, but they don’t know what search you entered beforehand, nor can they use personal information to identify you.

DuckDuckGo additionally offers an encrypted version that automatically changes links from a number of major sites to point to the encrypted versions, including Wikipedia, Facebook, Twitter, and Amazon.

Private browsing is not totally private.

Private browsing is not the same as secure browsing. And it’s not really completely private. It simply hides your activity from being viewed on your computer through the history feature.

 

  • If you use private browsing on a computer at work that’s connected to a network, the network administrator can always see what sites you’ve visited (if they want to).
  • If there is spyware on your computer, your online activities could still be tracked.
  • Internet protection software, used by families to filter and monitor Internet content, can track even “private” viewing sessions.
  • Your Internet Service Provider also has access to your online history, but they could search it and report it only if they were directed to through a legal action.

How to clear your history in any browser

https://www.howtogeek.com/304218/how-to-clear-your-history-in-any-browser/

One last thing.

Just remember that if you choose to clear your browser’s history or browse privately, you’re on your own to find a Web page again. That could haunt you when you’re looking for that ONE recipe you saw the day before for chocolate cake that was the most delicious thing you’ve ever seen. Good lucking finding it out of the other 10,300,000 recipes for chocolate cake.

HANDY GOOGLE CHROME EXTENSIONS THAT MAKE BROWSING A BREEZE

Posted on February 28, 2017 by chiltonweb

MOMENTUM

The Momentum Chrome extension has over 2.5 million users and you can see why once you install it. It has a compelling purpose: to turn your new tab page into a useful (and beautiful) productivity tool. Momentum walks you through the setup process after you install it. What you will notice first are the lovely background images. You will also see the weather up in the corner, the time displayed prominently in the middle, a pleasant greeting, and an inspirational quote at the bottom.

Momentum lets you build a to-do list, set daily goals, and keep important links at your fingertips. Every time you open a new tab, you will see a reminder to help keep you on task. It’s a big step up from the regular Chrome new tab window.

GOOGLE KEEP

The internet is a big place and it can be a challenge to keep track of what’s truly important to you as you’re traveling from website to website, absorbing information. Google Keep is a way to catalog pages, images, and text for easy access later on.

You can access your saved information through keep.google.com. To add to your Keep collection, install the extension, and then just click the lightbulb icon in the upper corner of Chrome. It will give you the option to add a note. You can also save individual images and selected text. Later, you can head to keep.google.com to add labels, archive or trash a saved item, or set a reminder. This is like a much more advanced version of the old bookmarks feature. Your inner organizer will rejoice.

WIKIWAND

Wikipedia is an incredible resource, a fountain of knowledge covering everything from celebrity biographies to historical events. But it’s not the prettiest website around. You can transform Wikipedia’s utilitarian interface into a more modern web experience with Wikiwand. Install the extension, head over to Wikipedia, and you will immediately notice the cleaner layout, larger font, and visually appealing photo collages. The table of contents for each page now loads in a bar on the left and stays accessible even as you scroll through long articles.

Naturally, Wikiwand will appeal to anyone who spends a fair amount of time browsing through Wikipedia, but it’s also a welcome improvement on the interface for casual users looking for a more comfortable way to interact with the site. You will have a hard time going back to the regular Wikipedia formatting after you’ve discovered Wikiwand.

GRAMMARLY

We all like to make a good impression with our writing, but typos and grammar errors can easily slip into emails, status updates, and other internet endeavors. Chrome has a built-in spell-checker, but you can access more features by installing the Grammarly extension.

Grammarly handles the usual spell-checking duties by underlining words and giving you suggested replacement options, but it also monitors your writing context and looks for correctly spelled words that may be out of place, like “very” and “vary” or “pore” and “poor.” The extension does have some limitations. For example, Grammarly doesn’t work with Google Docs, but it will help clean up your writing on most popular sites, including Gmail, Facebook and Twitter.

LAZARUS: FORM RECOVERY

You’re filling in a contact form, spending some time on a well-crafted message. There are many things that can go wrong. Maybe you accidentally close the tab, or you get a network error and when you reload the page, everything you just wrote is gone. The Lazarus extension has your back when these problems crop up. It automatically saves everything you type into web forms, so you can just refill the form and go on with your day.

You know Lazarus is at work when you see a small ankh symbol in the corner of the text box. Click on it to see what Lazarus is saving or to choose the text you want reinserted into the form. You might not need it very often, but you will be glad it’s there when you do run into a problem.

 

 

 

Change this one browser setting to book a cheaper vacation or buy things without the price jumping up

INCOGNITO MODE

This is the trick that most people never think of. Most airfare tips have to do with the airline itself, and the way these fares change over time. But this trick has to do with your browser, and how it communicates with flight-booking websites. When you upload a page, the website remembers that you visited before. Many bargain-hunters believe that this awareness causes the prices to steadily climb because you have already expressed interest in a given itinerary.
Browsing incognito
Google Chrome: There are a few ways to open an Incognito browser if you’re using Google Chrome. The first is to right click on the Google Chrome icon before you launch the application. This will bring up a menu with the option, “New Incognito Window.”

The second option is easy to use if you’re already browsing in Google Chrome. Simply open a new tab, then hit (and hold) the following keys down: Control, Shift, N (Command, Shift, N for Mac users).
Firefox: In Firefox, this private browsing option isn’t called “Incognito Mode,” it’s called “Private Window.” To access this, just open a new browser and click the Settings icon in the top right-hand corner. There, you’ll see a drop-down menu that lists an option called “New Private Window.”

Safari (on desktop): When using Safari on your Mac, you can open a Private Window in the same way as Google Chrome. Just right click on the icon, and select “New Private Window.”

Safari (on mobile): On mobile, opening a Private Window is a little bit different. While in the browser, tap the Pages icon in the bottom right-hand corner. This will show you all of the windows you have open, and at the bottom of the screen, you’ll see the + sign to open another window. Tapping the + sign will open a regular browser. If you’d rather browse privately, be sure to tap “Private” right beside it.

Android: To prevent the website from recognizing your IP address, Android users can employ their “incognito mode.” To use an incognito window on your Android device, open Chrome, then click More (the three vertical dots), then hit Incognito Window. When the new window opens, you’ll see the incognito icon, which looks like a face with a fedora and glasses.
Not every device or browser has an incognito-like feature, but there’s another way to get a similar effect: Most websites recognize your returning visit because of the cookies they install on your computer. Just delete all your cookies and browsing history, and these online services won’t recognize you.
There is some debate on whether using Incognito Windows and eliminating cookies don’t have a substantial impact on airfares. Each website works differently, so it’s hard to say. But feel free to tinker with a regular window and an Incognito Window and see what happens. When it comes to travel, it isn’t the destination but the journey.

Private browsing on the internet

DuckDuckGo

Increased state surveillance, countless security breaches and widespread concern about data sharing have spooked many of us into wanting to protect our privacy more than ever.

Despite bubbling almost under the radar for nine years, anonymous search engine DuckDuckGo is now finding its stride in this current climate. In January, it announced it had passed ten billion searches, with four billion occurring in 2016.

What is DuckDuckGo?

DuckDuckGo describes itself as “the search engine that doesn’t track you”. It promises not to use cookies to follow users and says it doesn’t collect any personal information on those who use it. Even your IP address is hidden.

All hail the privacy pioneers! DuckDuckGo’s ambitious plans to be more than a search engine

How is it different to Google and Bing?

All hail the privacy pioneers! DuckDuckGo’s ambitious plans to be more than a search engine

When you click on links from Google and Bing, even in private mode, the search terms are sent to the site you’re visiting in the HTTP referrer header. When you visit that site, your computer automatically shares information, such as your IP address. This information can be used to identify you.

DuckDuckGo calls this “search leakage” and prevents it happening by default on its search results. Instead, when you click on a link on the site it redirects that request in such a way to prevent it sending your search terms to other sites. The sites know that you visited them, but they don’t know what search you entered beforehand, nor can they use personal information to identify you.

DuckDuckGo additionally offers an encrypted version that automatically changes links from a number of major sites to point to the encrypted versions, including Wikipedia, Facebook, Twitter, and Amazon.