Change this one browser setting to book a cheaper vacation or buy things without the price jumping up

INCOGNITO MODE

This is the trick that most people never think of. Most airfare tips have to do with the airline itself, and the way these fares change over time. But this trick has to do with your browser, and how it communicates with flight-booking websites. When you upload a page, the website remembers that you visited before. Many bargain-hunters believe that this awareness causes the prices to steadily climb because you have already expressed interest in a given itinerary.
Browsing incognito
Google Chrome: There are a few ways to open an Incognito browser if you’re using Google Chrome. The first is to right click on the Google Chrome icon before you launch the application. This will bring up a menu with the option, “New Incognito Window.”

The second option is easy to use if you’re already browsing in Google Chrome. Simply open a new tab, then hit (and hold) the following keys down: Control, Shift, N (Command, Shift, N for Mac users).
Firefox: In Firefox, this private browsing option isn’t called “Incognito Mode,” it’s called “Private Window.” To access this, just open a new browser and click the Settings icon in the top right-hand corner. There, you’ll see a drop-down menu that lists an option called “New Private Window.”

Safari (on desktop): When using Safari on your Mac, you can open a Private Window in the same way as Google Chrome. Just right click on the icon, and select “New Private Window.”

Safari (on mobile): On mobile, opening a Private Window is a little bit different. While in the browser, tap the Pages icon in the bottom right-hand corner. This will show you all of the windows you have open, and at the bottom of the screen, you’ll see the + sign to open another window. Tapping the + sign will open a regular browser. If you’d rather browse privately, be sure to tap “Private” right beside it.

Android: To prevent the website from recognizing your IP address, Android users can employ their “incognito mode.” To use an incognito window on your Android device, open Chrome, then click More (the three vertical dots), then hit Incognito Window. When the new window opens, you’ll see the incognito icon, which looks like a face with a fedora and glasses.
Not every device or browser has an incognito-like feature, but there’s another way to get a similar effect: Most websites recognize your returning visit because of the cookies they install on your computer. Just delete all your cookies and browsing history, and these online services won’t recognize you.
There is some debate on whether using Incognito Windows and eliminating cookies don’t have a substantial impact on airfares. Each website works differently, so it’s hard to say. But feel free to tinker with a regular window and an Incognito Window and see what happens. When it comes to travel, it isn’t the destination but the journey.

Private browsing on the internet

DuckDuckGo

Increased state surveillance, countless security breaches and widespread concern about data sharing have spooked many of us into wanting to protect our privacy more than ever.

Despite bubbling almost under the radar for nine years, anonymous search engine DuckDuckGo is now finding its stride in this current climate. In January, it announced it had passed ten billion searches, with four billion occurring in 2016.

What is DuckDuckGo?

DuckDuckGo describes itself as “the search engine that doesn’t track you”. It promises not to use cookies to follow users and says it doesn’t collect any personal information on those who use it. Even your IP address is hidden.

All hail the privacy pioneers! DuckDuckGo’s ambitious plans to be more than a search engine

How is it different to Google and Bing?

All hail the privacy pioneers! DuckDuckGo’s ambitious plans to be more than a search engine

When you click on links from Google and Bing, even in private mode, the search terms are sent to the site you’re visiting in the HTTP referrer header. When you visit that site, your computer automatically shares information, such as your IP address. This information can be used to identify you.

DuckDuckGo calls this “search leakage” and prevents it happening by default on its search results. Instead, when you click on a link on the site it redirects that request in such a way to prevent it sending your search terms to other sites. The sites know that you visited them, but they don’t know what search you entered beforehand, nor can they use personal information to identify you.

DuckDuckGo additionally offers an encrypted version that automatically changes links from a number of major sites to point to the encrypted versions, including Wikipedia, Facebook, Twitter, and Amazon.